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Women's Nutrition

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Women's Nutrition

While optimal nutrition for older infants and young children is currently a global focus, we must not forget that women’s nutrition is also critical. Thus, this edition of Sight and Life focuses on women's nutrition. 

According to Preetu Mishra and Jee Hyun Rah, from the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in New Delhi, India, scientific evidence shows that a large proportion of pregnant adolescents are still growing in height during and following pregnancy. In the article, "Closing the Nutrient Gap During Adolescent Pregnancies,” they recommend strategies to prevent early and frequent pregnancies until adult height is reached and explain the importance of implementing reproductive nutrition and health programs and policies for adolescents.

An exciting public-private partnership in Ghana, known as Affordable Nutritious Foods for Women (ANF4W), is looking at establishing a market-based solution to improve the nutritional status of women of reproductive age with fortified food products. Dr. Eva Monterrosa, Senior Scientific Manager at Sight and Life Foundation, describes in "Improving the Nutritional Status of Women of Reproductive Age," how the project aims to provide considerable amounts of the RNIs of 18 vitamins and minerals during the critical period of pregnancy and lactation when nutrient needs are elevated. 

Continue reading these articles and more about women's nutrition from leading experts through the pages of the Sight and Life Magazine.
Click here to download the full edition. 

Please find here the individual chapters in chronological order:

  Welcome: Can Diet Alone Deliver Good Nutrition?

  Infograph: Food Taboos During Pregnancy and Lactation Across the World

  Young Nutritionists Shine in Elevator Pitch Contest

  Rethinking Public Health in an Age of Pandemics

  Participatory Formative Research in Action

  Impact of Small-Quantity Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements on Iodine Status

  James Allen Olson Memorial Lecture

  Improving the Nutritional Status of Women of Reproductive Age

  The Micronutrient Composition of Human Milk

  Improving Nutrition in the First 1,000 Days through a Social Franchise Model

  Iron Supplementation in Predominantly Iron-Replete Populations

  Health Economics: Making Communications on Maternal Nutrition Work

  Addressing World Poverty through Women and Girls: A feminized solution?

  Improving Maternal and Child Nutrition Outcomes

  Civil Society: An essential partner for improved nutrition

  Cracking the Egg Potential During Pregnancy and Lactation

  Essential Fatty Acid Needs During Pregnancy and Lactation

  Protein Requirements of Pregnant and Lactating Women

  Closing the Nutrient Gap During Adolescent Pregnancies

  Improving Nutrition Among Adolescent Girls

  WFP Republic of Congo Nutrition-Sensitive Urban Safety Net Program

  Six Legs to Nutrition: A New Old Food Source

  Stunting: Malnutrition or Exploitation?

  Malnutrition and Psychosis in Don Quixote

  Professor Osman Galal (1931–2016)

  A Day in the Life of Lucy Martinez Sullivan

  18th International Society for Research in Human Milk & Lactation

  Landmark Global Nutrition Study Launched

  2016 CARIG Conference Convenes in San Diego

  Positioning Women’s Nutrition at the Center of Sustainable Development

  Rice Fortification

  Nutrition Problems of Female Carpet Workers in Kathmandu

  What's New

  Book Review of The First 1,000 Days

Global nutrition insights from leading experts in new book

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Global nutrition insights from leading experts in new book

“This insightful and timely book rightly argues that addressing malnutrition is crucial to achieving sustainable development.” KOFI ANNAN | CHAIR OF THE KOFI ANNAN FOUNDATION, FORMER SECRETARY-GENERAL OF THE UNITED NATIONS (1997-2006)

"Nutrition is a complex subject, affected by many intertwining factors. Good Nutrition: Perspectives for the 21st Century pulls it all together in one easy-to-follow volume."
ANNA LARTEY | PRESIDENT OF THE INTERNATIONAL UNION OF NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES AND DIRECTOR OF NUTRITION AT THE UNITED NATIONS FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION (FAO)

"Good Nutrition: Perspectives for the 21st century showcases the thinking of some of today’s most influential and respected scientists from a wide range of fields. With clear presentation and accessible argumentation, it offers a composite view of where global nutrition stands today and outlines a wide range of evidence-based approaches for bringing about positive change. The fact that its scope covers the developed as well as the developing world makes it all the more powerful, for there are no countries in the world today, however affluent they might be, that are not faced with significant malnutrition challenges. I am confident that scientists and policy-makers working in nutrition, food, agriculture and public health, as well as non-specialists, will find this publication informative, useful, and thought provoking, and that it will inspire everyone who reads it to help build a world in which nutrition is indeed recognized as a fundamental human right."
HILAL ELVER | UN SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON THE RIGHT TO FOOD

» CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD BOOK

  CLICK HERE TO READ PRESS RELEASE

 

 

 

Sight and Life is excited about the upcoming Micronutrient Forum with the theme ‘Positioning Women’s Nutrition at the Centre of Sustainable Development’ taking place in Cancun, Mexico from the 23rd to the 28th October. In addition to providing travel support to a number of delegates, we hope to meet...

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Sight and Life is excited about the upcoming Micronutrient Forum with the theme ‘Positioning Women’s Nutrition at the Centre of Sustainable Development’ taking place in Cancun, Mexico from the 23rd to the 28th October. In addition to providing travel support to a number of delegates, we hope to meet many of you at the Sight and Life booth and the symposia and sessions where our team is involved.

YOU ARE INVITED TO JOIN OUR SPONSORED SYMPOSIA…


Monday 24th – 14h00 till 15h30: Implementation research to improve implementation outcomes (coverage, adherence, quality, and equity) of micronutrient/nutrition programs and policies. Chaired by David Pelletier of Cornell University and the Society for Implementation Science in Nutrition (SISN) and Meera Shekar of the World Bank, this symposium will examine the challenges and opportunities for embracing implementation research and experiential knowledge from the perspective of stakeholders who are both producers and users of evidence. Guaranteed to be thought provoking and critical towards shaping the next phase of scaling up nutrition interventions.


Tuesday 25th – 17h30 till 19h00: The future of micronutrient innovation: ELEVATOR PITCH CONTEST. An elevator pitch to potential investors is a critical part of the entrepreneurial process. As competition for research and investment funds increases, young scientists need to precisely and persuasively articulate their ideas. Come and hear 12 scientists, engineers and entrepreneurs present their novel ideas in ingredients, food, supplements, mobile applications, demand generation tools, diagnostics and delivery platforms in just 5 minutes to a panel of experts and investors to potentially win a cash award of up to US$2000. Sight and Life will be hosting this event together with the TATA Trusts.

OTHER SYMPOSIA THAT WE CAN RECOMMEND…

  • Sunday 23rd – 17h30 till 19h00:  Identifying gaps, challenges and innovative solutions in program planning, implementation and monitoring for 2016 – 2020 organised by the Home Fortification Technical Advisory Group (HF-TAG).
  • Monday 24th – 10h30 till 12h00: Market based approaches to reduce micronutrient deficiencies in women of reproductive age and children – Experiences from Ghana organised by GIZ GmbH with the Sight and Life team speaking and chairing.

TRACK 4: TRANSFORMING THE ENABLING ENVIRONMENT TO FORGE A FUTURE FOR MICRONUTRIENTS – WHAT WILL IT TAKE?

Our Director, Klaus Kraemer, has led the development of Track 4 of the Forum program. This exciting track will include a mix of interactive panel discussions, expert speakers and abstract presentations aimed to encourage much needed open dialogue. It will address issues that are relevant and cutting edge including transformational leadership; how the SDGs have changed financing for nutrition; the economics of demand; opening the door to a new generation of partnerships; and talking the language needed to turn evidence into policy.

The full program is available»  here. 

WE LOOK FORWARD TO OUR TIME TOGETHER IN MEXICO

 

 

Focus on Food Systems

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Focus on Food Systems

A food system considers the multiple activities, resources and actors engaged in producing, processing, distributing and consuming food. These are all shaped by, and interact with, every- thing from soup to nuts – i.e., all the environmental, social, political and economic boundary conditions that determine what type of food can be produced where, how it is used, and by whom. All these elements are strongly influenced by global change drivers such as population growth, changing consumption patterns, biodiversity loss, and climate change. Given that our food systems are already struggling to bring home the bacon (i.e., to deliver on their intended outcomes of global food and nutrition security) these increasing pressures will catapult our tasks out of the frying pan and into the fire. 

 In order to ensure food and nutrition security for all, it is important to look at the issues in an integrated manner. This of course does not exclude the essential need for expert knowledge, but it does suggest that we need to spend more time understanding how issues are connected, their root causes, and where critical leverage points might be. This calls for greater exchange across disciplines, sectors and scales, and for new ways of thinking and working. We are grateful to the contributors to this issue for providing some food for thought about such approaches.

 

Please   click here to download the full Magazine.

Please find here the individual chapters in chronological order:

  Guest editorial(Kalpana Beesabathuni and Michelle Grant)

  Infograph How can governments support

  Making Stunting a Development Indicator

  Household Consumption and Expenditure Surveys

  Resilience in Food Systems

  Sustainable Food Systems for a Healthy World

  Non-Communicable Diseases, Food Systems

  The Multiple Burdens of Malnutrition

  Setting New Frontiers for 21st Century Food Systems

  Innovative Financing for Nutrition

  Improving Nutritious Food Systems by Establishing

  To Feed Ten Billion, Crop Yields Have to Rise

  China’s Nutrition Activities in Africa

  The Protein Challenge 2040

  The Role of Animal Nutrition in Sustainable

  Food Waste in the Developing World

  Dr Urban Jonsson (1944–2016)

  A Day in the Life of Patrizia Fracassi

  The Lazio Declaration

  The 2nd International Conference on Global Food Security

  Tackling Food System Challenges

  Technical Meeting on EED, the Microbiome

  Nutrition for Sustainable Development

  Technology and the Future of Food

  Tackling Malnutrition through Food Systems

  Key Findings from the European Commission

  African Countries Commit to Improve Vitamin A

  Some Common Myths Associated with Food Debunked

  What’s New

  Reviews & Notices

Event Proceedings and Recommendations for Food Fortification Programs

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Event Proceedings and Recommendations for Food Fortification Programs

This supplement summarizes the Summit proceedings and the recommendations arising from the event to improve fortification programs moving forward.

Part A of the supplement is the “Proceedings of the #FutureFortified Global Summit on Food Fortification.” This includes the Summit content, its partnerships, conclusions, and the first-ever global consensus document on fortification: “The Arusha Statement on Food Fortification.”
Part B comprises “Recommendations for Food Fortification Programs.” This is the fortification TAG report elaborating on the five Summit Statement recommendations on regulatory monitoring, evidence and guidelines, advocacy, resourcing and transparent reporting. 

This supplement will help implementing agencies, policy-makers and donors, in particular, to improve coordination in the nutrition and food sectors. This in turn will help expand, improve and sustain national fortification programs, and ensure they help achieve public health objectives and relevant sustainable development goals.

  Click here to download the supplement (2.3MB).

 

 

Sight and Life, in partnership with Tata Trusts, are co-sponsoring an Elevator Pitch Contest at the Micronutrient Forum in Cancun, Mexico in October this year. The competition is open to those with a PhD, conferred no longer than 2 years ago, and undergraduates or enrolled graduates and...

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Sight and Life, in partnership with Tata Trusts, are co-sponsoring an Elevator Pitch Contest at the Micronutrient Forum in Cancun, Mexico in October this year. The competition is open to those with a PhD, conferred no longer than 2 years ago, and undergraduates or enrolled graduates and postgraduates.

Through the competition we hope to stimulate innovation, creative thinking and entrepreneurship in products, services and technology to bring solutions to micronutrient deficiencies that still negatively impact individual lives and hamper national economies.

The Sight and Life Foundation is a humanitarian nutrition think tank working toward a world free of malnutrition. To this end we champion the global fight against malnutrition by advancing research, sharing best practices, and mobilizing support. Our mission is to innovate in nutrition towards eradicating malnutrition in women of childbearing age and their children, and so improve the lives of the world’s most vulnerable populations.

» Tata Trusts have played a pioneering role in transforming traditional ideas of philanthropy and have evolved it’s concept to create long-term sustainable impact in the communities it serves for over a century. The Trusts have identified among others, nutrition as a priority area believing that it has intergenerational consequences and a long-lasting impact on cognition and productivity. Among other areas The Trusts support and drive innovation in nutrition and have taken a multi-sectoral approach to effectively address maternal and child health, water and sanitation, food and nutritional security.

An elevator pitch is a critical part of the entrepreneurial process. As competition for research and investment funds increases, young scientists will need to effectively articulate their idea and do so in a manner that is persuasive and precise. At the » Micronutrient Forum 2016, Sight and Life and Tata Trusts are organizing an elevator pitch contest on disruptive ideas to stimulate interest and dialogue, especially among students, on micronutrient innovation and entrepreneurship.

Due to the level of interest in the contest we have:

EXTENDED THE DEADLINE to 15th July 2016

EXPANDED THE CRITERIA to include those with a recent PhD (conferred not more than 2 years ago) together with undergraduates or enrolled postgraduates.

To enter » click here

The Sight and Life Foundation is a nutrition think tank committed to our mission of innovating in nutrition towards eradicating malnutrition in women of childbearing age and their children, and thus improve the lives of the world’s most vulnerable populations. We currently have two positions...

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The Sight and Life Foundation is a nutrition think tank committed to our mission of innovating in nutrition towards eradicating malnutrition in women of childbearing age and their children, and thus improve the lives of the world’s most vulnerable populations. We currently have two positions available at the Sight and Life Foundation - based in Kaiseraugst, Switzerland - one is programmatic and the other administrative

MIYCN Nutrition Program Manager

The Sight and Life Foundation are looking for someone with 3-5 years working experience in successful research or implementation of nutrition programs in low and middle income countries, to manage a portfolio of global maternal, infant and young child nutrition partnerships and programs. The position, suited for someone with a master’s degree in nutrition or public health, will require that you work collaboratively with institutional partners to design, oversee, operationalize, and manage several joint projects simultaneously.

The position is based in Switzerland, but will involve about 30% travel. The Nutrition Program Manager will report to the Senior Nutrition Manager, Dr Eva Monterrosa. So if you have a curiosity for science, creativity in thinking and solutions; have a pro-active and hands on mentality and; consider yourself a team player, flexible, diplomatic, persuasive and able to handle high pressure: then to read more about this position » click here 

Global Coordinator

This position provides the Sight and Life Foundation team, situated in Switzerland, India, United Kingdom and South Africa, with project planning and coordination support. It requires operational (including budget and cost planning, expenditure tracking, routine correspondence and travel management) and coordinating liaison between Sight and Life and its internal and external stakeholders (including database management), and coordinating projects, assisting with dissemination and communication activities.

The ideal candidate must have a bachelor or master degree in business administration, international studies and communication. The post is based in Kaiseraugst, Switzerland. The Global Coordinator will report to the Director, Dr Klaus Kraemer. So if you have experience in administration, project and risk management and are highly organized, flexible and can work independently with minimum supervision, then » click here for more about this position.

Apply to our Elevator Pitch Contest and win a trip to Cancun, Mexico

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Apply to our Elevator Pitch Contest and win a trip to Cancun, Mexico

Are you enrolled in a graduate or a post-graduate program?

If you answered yes, then apply to our Elevator Pitch Contest and win a trip to Cancun and a prize money of 2000USD.

We are looking for novel PRODUCTS, SERVICES AND TECHNOLOGIES.

For more details and to register,»  click here.

Blog on Global Nutrition Report by Eva Monterrosa

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Blog on Global Nutrition Report

by Eva Monterrosa

I recently read a great opinion piece in the New York Times titled ‘» Ideas Help No One on a Shelf. Take Them to the World’.  The writer, Tina Rosenberg, stated, “Whatever problem possesses you, we already have plenty of ways to solve it. Many have been rigorously tested and have a lot of evidence behind them — and yet they’re sitting on a shelf. So don’t invent something new. If you want to make a contribution, choose one of those ideas — and spread it.”  

» Click here to read Evas Blog on Global Nutrition Report about why implementation science will become indispensable in nutrition work.

New blog in the Huffington Post by Dr Klaus Kraemer together with Dr Richard Semba, JHU on a new study just published

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New blog in the Huffington Post by Dr Klaus Kraemer together with Dr Richard Semba, JHU on a new study just published

Today, some 160 million children under five years of age don’t get the food and nutrients that their bodies need for optimal growth and development. One hundred and sixty million children that are likely to remain trapped in a vicious cycle of malnutrition and poverty. No wonder the ‘new’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have ‘no poverty’ and ‘zero hunger’ as the first and second of the 17 Global Goals. This makes the eradication of malnutrition, with a special focus on children, a top priority for countries as they turn the SDGs into actions.

Over the last four decades, much of the focus in addressing chronic malnutrition was on ensuring that children received sufficient micronutrients - particularly vitamin A, iodine, iron, zinc, and folate. There was the widespread assumption that they were receiving enough protein from their basic diet. So micronutrient malnutrition also known as ‘hidden hunger‘, because vitamin and mineral deficiencies are not often obvious to the eye, has dominated efforts and innovations to improve the nutrition of children under five.

Potentially important insights going forward have come to light in a paper just published in EBioMedicine. This new research, carried out by scientists at the Johns Hopkins University, the National Institute on Aging, University of Maryland, Washington University in St. Louis, University of Malawi, and the Sight and Life Foundation, analyzed blood samples of over 300 children with and without stunting. The children, aged between one and five years, lived in villages in rural Malawi. Instead of focusing on micronutrients, the research looked at the essential amino acids that are the building blocks of proteins, and must come from the diet.

The striking finding of the study is that all nine essential amino acids were significantly lower in stunted children compared with non-stunted children. In fact, most of the amino acid levels were as much as 15-20% lower in the stunted children. This is important because it tells us that stunted children are in reality not receiving sufficient quality protein from their diet and this lack of essential amino acids means children will not grow normally even if they receive the necessary micronutrients.

How did protein fall off the international development map?

» Click here to read the full story!

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